CSP Fast Pass Lesson Roadmap

/CSP Fast Pass Lesson Roadmap
CSP Fast Pass Lesson Roadmap2018-04-18T11:07:04+00:00
1) Agile Coaching Quick Start – Part I

The Scrum Guide identifies coaching as a service provided by ScrumMasters to Development Teams and organizations, however coaching methods and practices are not defined.  This lesson introduces a basic and effective coaching model to equip anyone to get started.  While this lesson addresses the needs of people in coaching roles, the model and principles apply in various relationship contexts such as more experienced and less experience Product Owners who work together.  By the end of this lesson, you will begin applying the model in your context.

2) Agile Coaching Quick Start – Part II

This lesson explores more deeply the selection and design of interventions, tools for reflection and a broade2 edited-2r model for personal development as an Agile coach.  You will actively use the model to make sense of your observations to assess potential actions, design and complete an intervention and reflect on the outcome. By the end of this lesson, you will have the initial skills and confidence to coach teams and individuals.

3) Coaching Executives with Confidence

3Practitioners must develop the confidence and ability to coach executives in the context of Agile – Scrum, other frameworks, practices and organizational change – in order for organizations to achieve desired business outcomes through Agile adoption.  This lesson addresses the uniqueness of coaching up – managers and executives. While the same coaching models and principles apply, the context of coaching up introduces nuances for preparation, mindset, interaction and outcomes.  While this lesson won’t make you an expert, it will prepare you to engage in meaningful, productive conversations with executives with confidence.

4) Collaboration Frameworks – Part 1

4-editedCollaboration: to work together, especially in a joint intellectual effort
Framework: a basic conceptual structure that supports a particular approach to a specific objective and serves as a guide that can be modified

Scrum, and other Agile frameworks, emphasize collaboration to achieve goals.  The activities of Scrum – Daily Scrum, Sprint Planning, Product Backlog refinement, etc. – provide opportunities for collaboration.  However, Scrum intentionally omits specific guidance on how to collaborate to complete activities.

This lesson introduces proven frameworks to improve and amplify collaboration with teams and customers to gather requirements, improve retrospectives, prioritize backlogs and more.  We’ll start with in-person, team-oriented frameworks in this lesson, then move on to add online, team and customer-oriented frameworks in the next lesson.  By the end of these lessons, you will have practical tools to do your job more effectively and efficiently with an additional certification as a Collaboration Architect!

5) Collaboration Frameworks – Part 2

Now that you have completed Collaboration Frameworks – Part 1, you’re ready to move on to online collaboration 5-editframeworks.  We’ll dive into the nuances of online facilitation, customer interactions, available tools and how to extend what’s available to exactly what you need for a specific collaboration scenario.  Once you complete this lesson, you will have multiple collaboration frameworks and mediums available – and you will be a Collaboration Architect!

6) No More Bad Meetings! Get In & Get Out Quick

Ever wonder why so many meetings get mired in meaningless debate over insignificant details?  If this only happened occasionally that would be one thing, but a regular regime of bad meetings significantly impacts project quality, communication, morale and stakeholder outcomes.

In this one-hour lesson, discover the factors that contribute to bad meetings and simple, easy-to-use techniques to keep your next workplace dialogue focused, meaningful and engaging.  Your next powerful meeting begins today!

7) Developing Inclusive Solutions: Going From Talk to Follow Through

One of the big challenges to overcome with distributed Scrum Teams is maintaining momentum and follow though after the call is over.  As a leader, one might believe everyone is in agreement on the next steps and action items, but only later does one come to find out that not everyone had bought in to the final decision.  Ugh!!

During this one-hour lesson, learn how to build and facilitate inclusive solutions that work for everyone on the Team.  Find new ways to make decisions and how to identify whether the Team’s support is enthusiastic or merely lukewarm.  Go beyond just talk and into action.

8) Hear All Points of View: Facilitative Listening Skills for Agile Leaders

8-editedAre the meetings you attend mostly monologue and people speaking past one another and less about dialogue and collaboration?  Or are meetings more about getting noticed by management and less about getting any work done?  Chances are these meetings lacked a facilitator or were badly facilitated by a leader with an interest in a specific outcome.

In this two-hour lesson, learn the advanced facilitation skills necessary to bring forth multiple viewpoints necessary for collaboration and dialogue.  Practice new listening skills that keep your meeting conversations lively, engaging and on track.

9) User Stories That Don’t Suck: Capturing and Understanding the Customer’s Needs

Most user stories are written poorly.  On one end of the spectrum, there is simply not enough detail and the Team 9edited-2
remains unsure what to build.  On the opposite end, user stories contain too much detail which encourages slavish conformance to the requirements.  In both cases, deep understanding of the user’s needs, requirements and priorities remain unspoken, poorly communicated and badly implemented.

During this one-hour lesson, you will learn the origins of user stories and how to write better user stories.  Understand how to identify a story that is too big for your Team and pick up numerous methods to break larger stories into features that can be completed by a cross-functional Team.

10) Use Cases: Thinking About the Entire Problem

10When XP introduced the world to user stories in the early 2000’s, they were widely adopted and prompted as a powerful alternative to the heavyweight, up-front requirements process of the past.  Unfortunately, in the rush to embrace user stories many Agile practitioners left behind an important design tool – use cases – due to their association with past practice.

In this lesson, you will have the opportunity to re-acquaint yourself with use cases and learn how they can be applied side-by-side with user stories.

11) Catalyze Agile Adoption

11-editedHow does an Agile adoption start?  What can one person do to cause change?  This lesson identifies techniques and tools to catalyze Agile adoption.  We’ll start small at the team level and end with ideas to scale to the organizational level.  By learning how people respond to change, you will be prepared to appeal to their rational and emotional needs.  Upon completion, you’ll be ready and confident to cause and possibly accelerate change where you work.

12) Sustain Agile Adoption

Unfortunately, some Agile adoptions stall.  In order to sustain Agile adoption, we need to know why it fails.  Once we12-edited know what could go wrong, we can identify techniques to sustain Agile.  This lesson provides you with what you need to sustain the momentum and avoid the backslide.  You’ll be introduced to the concept of Communities of Practice to help build communities of ScrumMasters, Product Owners, developers, designers or any other group of passionate people focused on ensuring long-lasting Agility.  By the end of this lesson, you will have practical tools and advice to start a community the day after training with confidence, motivation and support to increase the chance of Agile succeeding through wider engagement of people.

13) Vision

The product vision provides a comprehensive, persistent goal for a team.  Without a clear, shared understanding of the product vision, teams can struggle to successfully meet customer needs.  This lesson focuses on development of meaningful, compelling, product vision statements by leveraging different techniques.

14) Roadmapping

14In fast-moving environments, Agile teams can get lost in the gap that exists between product vision, product backlogs and task boards.  A great collaboration framework can bridge this gap and ensures that business strategy drives market-driven, strategic product roadmaps while integrating diverse groups of the organization including architecture, operations and marketing.

This lesson provides a framework for developing a comprehensive, collaborative, market-driven product roadmap that ties together elements of strategy, product features, technology, marketing and people into a complete picture that can easily be communicated internally and externally.

15) Focus on Quality: Fundamentals of Extreme Programming

In 2001, the dominate Agile process was Extreme Programming (XP).  Fifteen years later, Scrum and Kanban 15-editeddominate the marketplace of ideas while XP has faded into the background.  This is a shame since much of what kindled the early interest and successes in Agile software development was returning the joy and quality to the technical work.

During this lesson, we will explore the fundamentals of XP and explain how technical excellence is the foundation for technical agility.  Hear specific proposals on how to make the technical work joyful again!

16) When Nothing Else Works: The Basics of Kanban to Get You Started Now

Is your organization ready for Agile, but not ready for Scrum? Or maybe what is assumed to be true in Scrum – 16-editeddedicated, cross-functional teams working on a single problem – is just not your day-to-day reality?  If this sounds like your situation, then Kanban might be the right tool for you and your team.

In this session, hear the fundamentals of Kanban, the connections to Lean Thinking and some simple practices to kick start your team using Kanban.  By the end of this lesson, formulate a few hypotheses and craft straightforward experiments to help customize and validate your process.

17) Focus on Flow: The Lean Thinking Patch for Scrum

When Scrum and Agile are done well, this new way of working impacts other parts of the business.  The relentless focus on customer satisfaction, collaboration and technical excellence creates ripple effects across the enterprise.  For business leaders comfortable with the status quo, all the associated change brought about by Scrum and Agile can feel unsettling and possibly dangerous.

In this session, you will learn the foundations of Lean Thinking that drive change and develop a meaningful and relevant vocabulary to communicate with people outside of the software world about the need for change.  Turn those who might be hostile and indifferent to your ideas into your champions and allies.

 

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